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Media Packet

Background Materials

Download Sage Grouse Initiative 2.0 – Investment Strategy FY 2015-2018 to learn what’s in store for proactive rangeland conservation.

To see the latest results, read SGI’s Success on the Range Report (July 2015).

For more background on the places and people involved in our conservation projects, watch these SGI YouTube videos.

See the results from 2010-2015 in this Working Lands For Wildlife: Greater Sage Grouse Scorecard.

For a brief overview of our goals and projects, read the Sage Grouse Initiative Brochure.

Download photos  from the SGI Photo Gallery.

View our Rancher Success Stories.

 

Featured News Stories:

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New York Times (February 2015) – “Sage Grouse Spending to top $750 Million by 2018” by the Associated Press

Working Ranch Magazine (June 2014) – “Special Report: The Sage Grouse Initiative” by SGI Communications Director Deborah Richie

NPR Morning Edition (July 2013) – “In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance to Save the Sage Grouse” by Christopher Joyce

Bugle Magazine (October 2012) – “Destinies Intertwined: Saving Sage Grouse and Helping Elk Too” by Hannah J. Ryan

The Nature Conservancy (January 2012) – “On the Life List” by Jim Robbins

New York Times (February 2011) “Safeguarding Sage Grouse and Their Elaborate Courtship Dance” by Jim Robbins

Recent News Stories

Beaver ponds provide a refuge for fish and wildlife in a burned landscape near Hailey, Idaho. Photo: Joe Wheaton Beaver Breaks: How Beavers (and low-tech riparian restoration) Help Reduce Impacts From Fire

Beaver ponds produce great wet habitat which then provides a refuge for fish and wildlife in a burned landscape near Hailey, Idaho. Photo: Joe Wheaton Beavers once lived in nearly every watershed in the U.S. Their constant engineering created vast wetlands that provided critically important habitat for a diverse array of wildlife and plant species. […]

Ask an Expert: The Ascent and Spread of Annual Invasive Grasses in the Great Basin

Ask an Expert: Join Joe Smith as he discusses his new research highlighting how annual invasive grasses are spreading in the Great Basin and what this means for conservation.

Cheatgrass is an annual invasive plant that crowds out native plants in sagebrush range. Publication Alert: Annual Invasive Grasses Spreading Through Great Basin to Higher Elevations and Northern Aspects

Working Lands for Wildlife research is showing that annual invasive grasses are moving up in elevation and to more northern aspects throughout the Great Basin. >>READ THE STUDY<<   Sweeping sagebrush and salt desert shrublands typify the Great Basin – a 200,000-square-mile landscape that encompasses much of Nevada and parts of Utah, Idaho, Oregon, Wyoming, […]

To read more News stories >