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Welcome to our link page with easy access to content we’ve shared on our Instagram channel.

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Make sure to scroll down as posts are organized with the most recent post on top.


 

 

Post caption: The sagebrush sea isn’t home to only sagebrush plants. Healthy and productive sagebrush-steppe also hosts a beautiful community of wildflowers, like the paintbrush, lupine, and arrowleaf balsamroot seen in this photo. In the spring and summer, these plants provide nutritious food to hens and chicks. Here’s hoping some more April showers will make May wildflowers abundant! Learn more about wildflowers in the Western Working Lands Snapshot post on our site; link in bio above ☝️. Photo: Brianna Randall. Click on the photo to access the Western Working Lands Snapshot post about wildflowers. IG post from 4.25.22.

 


 

 

Post caption: All of our work is guided by our Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome. This comprehensive document identifies major threats (see photo) facing sagebrush rangelands and the wildlife that depend on them. It also provide science-backed conservation solutions that can help reduce these threats and promote healthy and resilient rangelands. Check it out to learn more about how we’re working across sagebrush country for the next few years. Link to more information on the Framework in our bio above ☝️Click on the photo to access the Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome and the associated science regarding the threats we’re addressing. IG post from 4.20.22.

 


 

 

Post caption: HYH of the Northern bobwhite aka the bobwhite quail? This ground-dwelling bird is easier to hear than it is to see, and it is a popular game bird in much of the U.S. The USDA-NRCS, through Working Lands for Wildlife, has just released a new plan guiding conservation work across the eastern and central grasslands and savannas of the U.S., where the bobwhite live. The plan will guide voluntary conservation work over the next five years across 25 states, including over 7 million acres of new conservation practices on productive, working lands. Great news for bobwhite and for landowners throughout this large region. Click on the image to read more about the USDA’s plan for America’s central and eastern grasslands and savannas. IG post from 4.8.22

 


Mule Deer Sagebrush by Susan Morse.

 

 

 

Post caption: Mule deer and sage grouse share between 16 and 19 million acres of sagebrush range. Many critical mule deer migratory corridors overlap with core sage grouse habitat. During winter, mule deer rely on sagebrush, just like sage grouse do. When we restore and conserve habitat for one species, we benefit the other. Learn more about how mule deer use sagebrush range in a Ask an Expert post featuring the former President of the Mule Deer Foundation…click on the link in our bio to access the post. 📷: Susan Morse. Click on the photo to access the Ask an Expert with Miles Moretti, former President of the Mule Deer Foundation. IG post from 3-30-22.

 


 

 

 

 

Post caption: Springtime means blooming flowers and that means pollinators. Without these hardworking critters (bugs, birds, bats, butterflies…) we’d miss out on things like chocolate, nuts, fruits, and so much more. Here in the West, pollinators share a lot of habitat with livestock, so how does grazing affect pollinators? This great Ask an Expert from our archives has answers. Click on the link in our bio to access the post and learn all about grazing and native pollinators. ☝️ Photo: Jim Hudgins, USFWS. Click on the image to access the Ask an Expert about grazing and native pollinators. IG post from 3.21.22

 


 

 

Post caption: There’s a new strategy for managing threats across the sagebrush sea: Defend the Core! This strategy “flips the script” on how we’ve been managing threats by focusing on proactively conserving intact rangeland cores from threats like invasive annual grasses and encroaching woody species. Instead of working where these invaders have taken over, groups are focusing on reducing the risk that healthy rangeland cores will become degraded. But, we don’t stop there. Defend the Core is just part of the strategy….it also includes efforts to “Grow the Core” (working to expand healthy rangeland into areas that may have invasive grasses or trees but aren’t completely over run) and to “Mitigate Impacts” (working with communities to help them adapt to and reduce impacts from already degraded landscapes). Learn more about the Defend the Core, Grow the Core, and Mitigate Impacts strategy by following the link in our bio above ☝️Click on the image to learn more about the Defend the Core strategy and how we’re applying it invasive annual grasses in sagebrush country. IG post from 3.11.22.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Such. Cool. News. Our science advisor, Dirac Twidwell, recently published a paper that cataloged the largest, continuous grasslands on Earth. Spoiler: two of them are here in the U.S.!!!! 🌠🎆 Yup…the Sandhills of Nebraska are the largest temperate/tropical grassland and the sagebrush-steppe in central Wyoming is the second largest desert grassland on the entire planet. Conserving intact grasslands is THE best way we can ensure these critical ecosystems continue to provide the services they do. Learn more about the paper in by following the link in our bio above ☝️ Photo of WY sagebrush by Tom Koerner, USFWS, Seedskadee NWR. Click on the image to read more about the paper and how these two grasslands ranked globally. IG post from 3.9.22.


 

 

 

 

Post caption: In addition to being a stunning shot, this photo shows an intact core of healthy sagbebrush range. Wildflowers, perennial grasses and sagebrush dominate this landscape. There aren’t any trees (except high on the ridge in the background) and there aren’t any invasive grasses either. These “cores” are exactly what we’re focused on when we talk about our “Defend the Core” strategy for addressing rangeland threats in sagebrush country. We have a new post that expands on what “Defend the Core” means and how it’s being applied to fighting invasive annual grasses in sagebrush country. Access the post to learn more via the link in the bio above. ☝️ 📷 : Warner Mountains, OR | Jeremy Roberts, Conservation Media. Click on the image to access the post explaining Defend the Core. IG post from 2.28.22

 


 

 

Post caption: March may be just around the corner, but winter hasn’t quit yet! How do sage grouse survive the cold and snow? Unless it’s super cold for a long period, sage grouse do pretty well during the winter; they’re tough! When temps drop really low, they’ll burrow under the snow or under sagebrush. They also flock up to save energy and communally watch for predators. And, of course, they munch sagebrush leaves all winter and they’ll even gain weight during the winter. Learn more from our post: What Do Sage Grouse Do All Winter? Link in bio above ☝️ Photo: USFS, Curlew National Grassland. Click on the image to read the post What do Sage Grouse do All Winter. IG post from 2.23.22.

 


 

 

 

Post Caption: DYK that rangelands store 12% of the world’s terrestrial carbon? Most of that is stored underground in soils., which is why keeping rangelands “green side up” is so important. We use conservation easements as a key tool that keeps working rangelands whole, intact, and storing carbon 👍 Learn more about rangelands and carbon in the link in our bio above ☝️. Click on the image to learn more about rangelands and carbon. IG post from 2.16.22.

 


Beaver ponds provide an “emerald refuge” in a landscape burned by the Sharps Fire, Idaho. Photo: Joe Wheaton

 

 

Post caption: Today is World Wetlands Day! In the West, wetlands are rare but critical habitats that provide outsized benefits for wildlife and humans. During and after wildfire, wetlands provide refuge to wildlife. They serve up “green groceries” long after upland plants have dried out. They store water helping make rangelands more resilient to drought. They host diverse plant and animal communities. Only a small fraction of the West is considered “wet habitat” and much of that is on private lands, making our work conserving and restoring these emerald isles all the more important. Learn more about our mesic restoration work in the link in our bio above. ☝️ Photo of a green wetland following a wildfire in Idaho by Joe Wheaton. #WorldWetlandsDay2022. Click on the photo to learn more about the science behind SGI and WLFW’s mesic restoration work in the West. IG post from 2.2.22.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: In Big Sky Country, the Southwest Montana Sagebrush Partnership is making a real difference for sagebrush rangelands and the wildlife and communities that depend on healthy, resilient sagebrush habitat. From employing out-of-work fishing guides to establishing a youth employment program, the partnership is proving that creative thinking and sustained effort can truly benefit wildlife and people. Talk about win-win conservation solutions. Learn more about this awesome partnership in the link in our bio above ☝️. Click on the image to learn more about the Southwest Montana Sagebrush Partnership and to access the full infographic. IG post from 1.26.22

 


 

 

 

Post caption: DYK that we have a site that details the main threats facing sagebrush country and how we’re tackling them over the next five years? The site includes explainer videos about the threats AND it includes our Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome, which outlines our approach to tackling these threats. Want the science behind our work? That’s all there too! References, links to peer-reviewed papers, and more are all included. Check it out! Just click on the link in our bio to access the website! Click on the image to access the page. IG post from 1.10.22.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Invasive annual grasses, like the cheatgrass shown in this graphic, are a serious threat to the health and productivity of sagebrush rangelands. These invaders green up earlier than native perennials, sucking up precious early season moisture. Then, they dry out sooner, providing fuel for wildfire. They offer little forage value to wildlife or livestock. In short, they’re a significant threat. As our climate changes, tracking where these annuals are moving across the landscape is critical. New research from WLFW-affiliated researcher, Joe Smith, does just that. Smith’s work details how cheatgrass and other annuals are moving up in elevation and to more northerly aspects across the Great Basin. Learn more about Smith’s work in our latest Ask an Expert. Follow link in bio to access the post. Click on the image to access the Ask an Expert with Joe Smith about the spread of annual invasive grasses in the Great Basin. IG post from 1.5.22.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Did you get a chance to check out our new video about our long-term conifer removal project in the Warner Mountains of Oregon? Zip on over to our YouTube channel and take six minutes to watch it! It gives the full story of this amazing project, the science produced from it, and how both sage grouse and producers have benefited. Follow the link in our bio to access the YouTube page! And happy Friday! Photo from the Warner Mountains by Jeremy Roberts, Conservation Media. Click on the image to watch the Restoring the Sagebrush Sea: The Warner Mountains Story. IG post from 12.17.21.

 


Beaver ponds provide an “emerald refuge” in a landscape burned by the Sharps Fire, Idaho. Photo: Joe Wheaton

 

 

 

Post caption: Talk about a picture being worth 1,000 words! This photo highlights how beavers can help reduce impacts from wildfire…Notice how the beaver ponds and wetlands are green refuges in a sea of charred sagebrush. Joe Wheaton, who took this photo and is our mesic restoration partner at Anabranch Solutions and Utah State University, likes to say: “Water doesn’t burn.” Hard to argue with that, or with the example this photo provides. Learn more about how beavers help reduce impacts from fires and drought in our recent post. Link in bio above! Click on the image to learn more about beavers, fire, and drought. IG post from 12/15/21.

 


 

 

Post caption: We love sharing great photos of sage grouse and the sagebrush sea on this channel. But did you know we have a YouTube channel that’s packed with amazing video content, too? We just released an awesome new video about our long-term conifer-removal project in Oregon that’s fantastic and well worth a watch (of course, it’s too long to post here). This stunning photo is from the same area as the video and was taken by same person who helped us make the video. Hit the link in our bio to get to our YouTube channel and check out the content! Click on the image to access our YouTube channel and the Restoring the Sagebrush Sea: The Warner Mountains Story. IG post from 12.1.21

 


 

 

 

 

Post caption: Mark your calendars! On November 18 at 3pm ET, our science advisor, Dr. David Naugle, will be sharing highlights from a decade of science in the sagebrush biome on a webinar hosted by the USDA-NRCS Conservation Outcomes Program. Dr. Naugle will highlight the latest sagebrush science and how it’s informing our approach to voluntary conservation. No registration required; simply join via AdobeConnect at 3pm ET on the 18th. (https://nrcs.adobeconnect.com/ceap2/). Click on the link in bio above for more information👆 Click on the image to access the NRCS’ Conservation Outcomes Webinar page for more information about this webinar. IG post from 11.10.21.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Application windows for a variety of NRCS funding programs are set by each state. For consideration for this year’s funding, applicants need to apply within the window. Applications received after the deadline will be automatically entered into the next year’s application period. Fortunately, this site has all the different deadlines for each state, so folks can ensure they get their application in on time. Follow this link or click on the link in our bio and find the link from our website. Click on the image to visit the NRCS state funding deadline page. IG post from 11.3.21.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: In partnership with Pheasants Forever and other ID-based organizations, we are seeking two motivated Range and Wildlife Conservationist positions in Idaho – one in Burley and one in Malad. Join our team. Click on link in bio to access more info or follow url in image. Please share! Click on image to go to Pheasants Forever’s job page, scroll down and find the two positions for Burley and Malad, ID. IG post from 10.18.21.

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Today is a great day to share this amazing artwork, created by Louinda Garrity, a member of the Washoe Tribe. The artwork was featured in a brochure and story map that highlights the long-standing partnerships between tribes and the NRCS. Click on the link in our bio above to explore the storymap, brochure, and learn more about these amazing partnerships and what they’re doing for sagebrush and tribes. Click on the image to explore the story map featuring NRCS-tribal partnerships in sagebrush country. IG post from 10.11.21

 


Cover image of A Decade of Science Report

 

 

 

Post caption: Working with producers and partners to co-produce science is foundational to our conservation approach. And we’ve been busy….All told, WLFW-affiliated researchers and scientists have published more than 60 peer-reviewed papers that have been cited more than 1,200 times in the last 10 years! That’s an impressive and impactful body of work. Read about all of this work in our latest report: “A Decade of Science Support in the Sagebrush Biome.” Link in bio above. Click on the photo to read the full report. IG post from 10.1.21

 


 

 

 

Post caption: The old adage, “Practice makes perfect” applies to more than sports or music…It’s true for our low-tech mesic restoration work as well. This photo, from an Elko NV training in 2019, highlights our approach to education and hands-on practice. Before we ever head out into the field to build these structures in streams and creeks, we practice on dry land, making sure everyone in the group gets a chance to get their hands dirty. Learn more about how we’ve trained more than 2,000 people in these techniques on our website. Link to post in bio above. Photo: Jeremy Maestas. Click on the photo to read about how we’ve trained more than 2,000 practitioners in low-tech mesic restoration techniques. IG post from 9.27.21.

 

 


 

 

Post caption: Check out this amazing mural of a Gunnison sage grouse located in Provo, Utah. This photo was sent to us by our friend Eric M.

Artist Louis Masai was commissioned by Nu Skin, a Provo-based business to create a mural of Utah’s endangered species (the Gunnison sage grouse is currently listed as “Threatened” on the ESA).

In addition to being a gorgeous piece of art, the mural highlights how we’re all connected to sagebrush rangelands, whether we live in an urban or rural community. Learn more about this artwork via the link in our bio above. Artist: Louis Masai, Photo: Eric M. Click on the image for an article from the Provo-based Daily Herald Newspaper that shares some more info about the mural and artist. IG post from 9.15.21.

 

 


 

 

Post caption: DYK that sagebrush rangeland is the largest habitat type in North America? At more than 175 milion acres, this ecosystem is HUGE. Far from an arid wasteland, sagebrush country supports more than 350 species of plants and animals. Learn more about the sagebrush sea and our efforts to conserve healthy sagebrush range in our Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome. Follow link in our bio for more information! Click on the image to find the Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome and associated materials. IG post from 9.9.21

 


 

 

Post caption: Sharing another gorgeous shot from the “Sage Grouse: A Life Cycle in Photos” story map we created with the amazingly talented Noppadol Paothong. Click the link in our bio to find the full story map that features even more incredible images like this. Click on the photo to access the full story map featuring Noppadol Paothong’s incredible photography. IG Post from 9.8.21

 

 


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Post caption: This incredible shot is from a story map we created featuring the photography of renowned sage grouse photographer Noppadol Paothong. In addition to the amazing photos, the story map details a year life-cycle of sage grouse. Check it out via the link in our bio above! Photo: Noppadol Paothong.

Click on the photo to access the full story map featuring Noppadol Paothong’s incredible photography. IG post from 9.1.21

 


 

 

 

 

Post caption: When we talk about the specific low-tech structures we put into streams and rivers, we’re most often talking about Post-Assisted Log Structures, aka PALs and Beaver Dam Analogs, aka BDAs. Both use locally sourced materials and are designed to slow down water, but they work a bit differently. PALs promote wood accumulation while BDAs mimick beaver dams and create temporary ponding of water. This graphic, from our Low-Tech, Process-Based Restoration of Riverscapes Pocket Manual, explains the difference. For much more info on these two types of structures including detailed instructions and drawings, check out the pocket manual. Click the link in our bio to access the manual! 

Click on the photo to access the Low-tech, Process-based Restoration of Riverscapes Pocket Manual. IG post from 8.25.21.


 

 

 

 

 

Post Caption: Three cheers for the native plants of the sagebrush sea! These plants are the foundation of the sagebrush ecosystem, and their deep roots hold soil in place, retain moisture, and provide habitat and forage for wildlife. Find more native plant artwork on our website, link in bio above.

Click on the photo to learn more about our native roots. IG post from 8.20.21

 


 

 

 

Post caption: This illustration is from the Low-tech, Process-based Restoration of Riverscapes Pocket Manual we produced with the Utah State University Restoration Consortium. It shows how human-made beaver dams can help jump start river restoration and provide habitat for beavers to move in. Once the beavers are there, they build more structures and slow down more water which boosts riparian plant production. These techniques, along with beavers themselves, help make streams more resilient to fire and drought. With the summer we’ve been having out West, restoration like this is super valuable. Follow the link in our bio above to download your own, FREE, copy of the Pocket Manual. Even if you’re not a restoration professional, it’s a cool resource and worth a read.

Click on the photo to download a free copy of the Pocket Manual. IG post from 7.21.21

 

 


 

 

Post caption: DYK that Working Lands for Wildlife is nationwide? It’s true! From sagebrush country to the hardwood forests of Appalachia and from Hawaii to New England, WLFW works with landowners to benefit wildlife and their land. One effort that is closely aligned with the Sage Grouse Initiative is the Great Plains Grasslands Initiative. It’s an expanded version of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative which has focused on five southern Great Plains states. Now we’re going Plains-wide and focusing on healthy grasslands.

Learn more about the Great Plains Grasslands and what we’re doing to help in the Framework for Conservation Action in the Great Plains Grassland Biome. Follow the link in our bio to access the Framework and learn more. Photo: Two Lesser Prairie-Chickens dueling on a lek by Nick Richter.

Click on the photo to find the Framework for Conservation Action in the Great Plains Grasslands Biome. IG post from 7.12.21

 


 

 

 

 

 

Post caption: Have you heard about the “green glacier?” It’s what scientists and land managers call the expansion of trees across sagebrush lands. We’ve got a great new Ask an Expert featuring our woodland expansion expert, Jeremy Maestas. It’s a great resource for learning more about why trees are moving into areas they’ve never been, what the impacts are, and what we can do about it. Check it out via the link in our bio above. Photo: Conifer trees moving into sagebrush lands by Jeremy Roberts, Conservation Media.

Click on the photo to find the Ask an Expert about woodland expansion into sagebrush country. IG post from 7.9.21

 


 

 

 

 

Post caption: It’s #PollinatorsWeek! These amazing creatures do so much for us. Nearly 80% of the world’s flowering plants rely on pollinators for reproduction. The value of pollinators to agriculture is estimated at $200 billion a year (yes, $200 BILLION). Without pollinators, we wouldn’t have crops like nuts, chocolate, coffee, or spices! Learn more about pollinators in our Working Lands Snapshot post. See the link to our new Instagram-link page in bio above. Click that and you’ll be able to easily access the Working Lands Snapshot post! Photo: NRCS_MT.

Click on the photo to find the Working Lands Snapshot about pollinators. IG post from 6.21.21

 


 

 

 

Post caption: Excited to share this cool story out of Oregon. For nearly 10 years, SGI-researchers studied the effects of a strategic, long-term conifer removal project on sage grouse. How did the birds react to the project? Well, the researchers found that sage grouse populations growth rates were 12% higher in the treated area than in the control area (where no tree were cut). That’s huge! Learn more about this study and the results in our latest post. Link to new Instagram Link page on our website above. Just click the link in the bio to find more info. Before/After photos: Todd Forbes, BLM.

Click on the photo to find the post and study information. IG post from 6.16.21

 


 

 

 

Post caption: This graphic provides a “snapshot” of how we’re addressing the four big threats to sagebrush rangeland as detailed in our Framework For Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome. This collaboratively developed document outlines our approach to conserving sagebrush range over the next five years.

Click on the photo to find the Framework for Conservation Action in the Sagebrush Biome. IG post from 5.28.21.


 

 

 

Post caption: On Saturday, we shared some cool footage of sage grouse eggs tucked in under a sagebrush plant. Hens are just starting to lay eggs and in a month or so, they’ll be hatching. These photos (from the Field Guide we highlighted last week), show the difference between successful and unsuccessful hatches. Here’s hoping there’s a lot more successful hatches than not this year!

Click on the photo to download the Greater Sage Grouse Field Indicator Guide. IG post from 5.24.21.